Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Try to Remember

 The kind of September when Anna was a big first grader.

The kind of September when Katie found a corner in the big crib to jam her head into.

The kind of September when you had a tire to change in the mud...

...but were lucky enough to have the sprinkler get stuck right next to the pivot road. Close enough for an 80 year old and a 33 year old recovering from back surgery to be able to use the Spitz-Lift to drag the tire out of the wheel track and over to the pick-up...

...and drive it out rather than the normal wheel-it-out-by-hand business.

The kind of September when you came back to find that the sprinkler was still stuck...

...because you forgot to shift the gear case back into drive (cue Tommy Boy rant). And, having created a colossal mess of things, you are forced to run the sprinkler all the way around in reverse in order to break a path.

The kind of September when you can ride your bike over to the highway to check out the road paving machines.


The kind of September when Katie gets her fuzzy-pink-blanket-in-the-crib privileges revoked.


The kind of September when the corn takes forever to make it below 32% moisture. (High moisture corn is harvested between 26% and 32% moisture, ground, and put up for silage.)


The kind of September when you stop for gas in Satanta on your way to pick up seed and discover you have lost the trailer plug and then look up and see you are right across the street from a NAPA store. Woot!

The kind of September when local car dealers send total #fail junk mail.

The kind of September when you get enough rain to sprout weeds, but not enough rain to sprout wheat.


The kind of September when you try another load of wet corn a week later only to discover that the moisture has actually gone up a half a point.

The kind of September when cousin George insists his corn is ready to go and so you drive the combine 23 miles to the airport...

...only to discover that it is, in fact, still above 20% once you get out in it (the elevator will take corn at 20% moisture, but they really hammer you on the drying charges. The standard for dry corn is 15.5%, and we like it to be at least under 18% before harvesting.) and so you drive the combine all the way back home.

The kind of September when Katie keeps getting her li'l legs stuck between the bars in her crib.

Try to remember, and if you remember, then follow.

Whatever that means.

2 comments:

betsyann said...

Love it.

jmlo said...

I don't remember any of this...as much as I try.